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Category Archives: Deaf academics

Going Beyond Trust: Protecting My Integrity as a Deaf Academic — From Deaf Eyes on Interpreting

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DEOnIbookpageThis is the twelfth weekly installment featuring highlights from the 20 chapters in the new book, Deaf Eyes on Interpreting, edited by Thomas K. Holcomb and David H. Smith which was released in June by Gallaudet University Press.

In this chapter, Thomas K. Holcomb makes a case for a stronger and closer relationship between Deaf Academics and the interpreters who perform ASL to Spoken English interpreting work for them.  His point is that “just trusting” that an interpreter will do a excellent job is not enough. In a similar fashion to trusting a mechanic to work on your car or a dentist to work on your teeth, consumers need some kind of verification that the job is being done well.

In the case of interpreters, it is difficult for the Deaf academic to verify the quality of interpreters’ performance without direct observation. Holcomb shares his experience of having a transliterator work in his classroom to provide him with direct signed translation of the interpreters’ ASL to Spoken English interpretation of his lectures. He insists that such solutions need to be pursued in order to promote genuine trust among Deaf Academics in the work the interpreters do on their behalf.

 

A Social Justice Framework for Interpreting — From Deaf Eyes on Interpreting

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This is the eleventh installment featuring highlights from the 20 chapters in the new book, Deaf Eyes on Interpreting, edited by Thomas K. Holcomb and David H. Smith, which was recently released by Gallaudet University Press.

This chapter continues to explore the theme of interpreting issues related to Deaf academics. In their chapter, “Case Studies of International Conferences: A Social Justice Framework for Interpreting,” co-authors Patrick Boudreault and Genie Gertz provide an analysis of events that transpired at two international conferences. At both conferences, the Deaf people in attendance were frustrated with their limited access to participate in the conference proceedings. Because of this, they prepared formal documents outlining their concerns with the goal of identifying problem areas and solutions for increasing equality and access in future conference spaces. Using the social justice framework, Patrick and Genie examine these two documents with a focus on how interpreters can work closely together with Deaf people to ensure equality in multilingual spaces. They discuss the role and position of the interpreter, dynamics and power structures, and provide an action plan for getting interpreters to adopt a social justice framework.

Through the Eyes of Deaf Academics: Interpreting in the Context of Higher Education — From Deaf Eyes on Interpreting

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DEOnIbookpageThis is the tenth installment featuring highlights from the 20 chapters in the new book, Deaf Eyes on Interpreting, edited by Thomas K. Holcomb and David H. Smith, which was recently released by Gallaudet University Press.

Shifting the focus from the experiences of Deaf college students to Deaf professors, co-authors Dave Smith and Paul Ogden provide a close look at the expectations college faculty members have for their interpreters in order for them to successfully navigate the academic environment.

In this video clip, Dave Smith mentions several requirements for interpreting for Deaf professors in this environment where the focus is on supporting Deaf faculty members. Interpreters must possess an understanding of the wider context of higher education, including the specifics of the tenure and promotion process, the importance of collegiality, the critical need for appropriate register in voice interpretations, a feeling of trust between the professor and interpreter and even the vital role of the interpreter in picking up and relaying incidental information and office politics.