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Category Archives: Deaf Culture Values

Nyle DiMarco Embodies Deaf Cultural Values

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The Deaf community has gone wild about Nyle DiMarco. Not only because of his stunning dance routines on Dancing with the Stars or his winning the competition as America’s Next Top Model last February.   And not even because of his handsome looks or perfect physique. Rather, it is the ways in which he projects a positive and inspiring image of the Deaf community, demonstrating what Deaf people are capable of, regardless of their speaking or listening abilities.

12106741_1681736582063046_5381670987293833556_nVisit his website to learn more about Nyle, the collectivist nature of the Deaf community, the richness of a signing family, and some of his passions, including spreading the word about talented Deaf performers (#DeafTalent), the importance of Deaf owned companies and Nyle’s current priority: Deaf children and their families.

Strikingly, instead of just basking in his own success, Nyle has vowed to use his unique opportunities to bring attention to critical issues affecting Deaf people. In this way, he exemplifies the Deaf cultural value of giving back to the community. He is fully cognizant of the fact that most deaf children do not have the same privileges he had to become a bi-lingual individual with a healthy sense of self as a Deaf person. Because of this, he is capitalizing on his fame to support the work of the Deaf community, such as the Language Equality and Acquisition for Deaf Kids (Lead-K), the National Association of the Deaf, and Gallaudet University, with the goal of helping parents of deaf children understand the value of raising a deaf child who is bi-lingual in ASL and English, as opposed to trying to restrict the child to an English-only environment at home and school.

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To further his goal of making the world a better place for all Deaf people and their families, Nyle has established The Nyle DiMarco Foundation, whose website states “Nyle and the Foundation are guided by the principle that every child deserves love and language ” and adds that “the key to unlocking a Deaf child’s future is acquiring language at an early age.”

The Foundation’s aims include improving “access to accurate, research-based information about early language acquisition–specifically, the bilingual education approach. Through the early intervention process, the child’s language and literacy development should be the focal point.”

Check out this website to learn more about his work. This is what Deaf Culture is all about. No wonder the Deaf community is wild about Nyle!

 

 

FREE Resource for ASL, Deaf Culture and Interpreting Instructors

FREE Resource for ASL, Deaf Culture and Interpreting Instructors
RBS Workbook now available Free

RBS Workbook now available Free

Anna:
In conjunction with the October release of a new 3rd edition of my book Reading Between the Signs, the  publisher and I decided to make available as a FREE Ebook, the companion Workbook which was published several years ago.

The Workbook contains 22 exercises that help readers develop an intercultural perspective, undertake cultural self-examination and illuminate major contrasts between American Deaf and hearing cultures. Activities may be done either alone or in small groups. It complements all 3 editions of the book. Here is the link to download the whole book:

http://www.nicholasbrealey.com/Reading%20Between%20the%20Signs%20Workbook.pdf

Or you may get a FREE Kindle Version from Amazon 

Here is a sample exercise called: YOUR POLITE IS DIFFERENT FROM MY POLITE

Directions: Read the statements below and decide if they describe an attitude more often found in mainstream American (hearing) culture or in American Deaf culture. Put an H (for hearing) or a D (for Deaf ) in the spaces provided.

______ 1. Sharing personal information benefits us all.

______ 2. The “grapevine” shows people care about each other.

______ 3. Name-dropping is pretentious.

______ 4. Graphic descriptions of bodily functions and surgical procedures often make people uncomfortable.

______ 5. Describing your ties to well-known community members can demonstrate your trustworthiness.

______ 6. Stories regarding your own and others’ illnesses and medical treatments are important to share.

______ 7. Passing along the latest news about mutual friends is considered “talking behind their backs.”

______ 8. Softening a critical comment often makes it easier for the other person to accept.

______ 9. If you can’t say something nice, don’t say anything at all.

_____ 10. Some topics (such as money and bathroom habits) are off-limits in polite society.

_____ 11. You owe it to your friends to inform them if a new hairstyle is unbecoming.

_____ 12. If you have a criticism, tell it straight.

Draw lines between pairs of sentences above that express opposite messages.You should end up with six pairs.

Remember that these are generalizations of tendencies within each group.Individual members of either group may subscribe to the attitude expressed by a particular statement to a greater or lesser degree. (Suggested answers to this exercise appear in book on page 120.)


Please share this free resource with any ASL, Deaf Culture or Interpreting instructors that you know. Thanks!!

Reporting Bathroom Behavior – Is that really “Deaf Culture”?

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Tom:

These days on YouTube, you can find many attempts to explain differences between Deaf culture and hearing culture.  One good example is the work of  a CODA named Will (CODA8810).  He provides several episodes, which although exaggerated, illustrate how Deaf people can behave very differently from hearing people. One of his scenes depicts graphically the openness and the etiquette related to information sharing regarding what goes on in the bathroom. This kind of openness has long been the subject of debates among Deaf people as to the appropriateness of such disclosures.  You need to watch Will’s 3 short scenes on YouTube: to see for yourself. So, does this truly fit the definition of Deaf Culture?

As discussed in the book Introduction to American Deaf Culture, cultural behaviors can be categorized into three categories – explicit, implicit, and emblematic.  Some behaviors are explicitly regulated through laws or policies.  For example, the government determines the legal age for getting a driver’s license or drinking alcohol beverages.  The legal age for these actions varies from culture to culture.  Other behaviors are implicitly understood.  Rather than being regulated by laws or policies, they are generally accepted and practiced by the community members.  For example, tipping rules also vary from culture to culture.  Here in American restaurants, a tip of 15% to 20% of the bill is expected, but not mandated by law.  The final category is where behaviors are emblematic of the culture but not necessarily practiced by most members of the community.  For example, foul language is often used in American movies, giving an impression to people throughout the world that such behavior is typical of Americans.  While most Americans may not themselves swear as much as certain characters in movies, foul language has become emblematic of American culture.

In the case of Deaf culture, etiquette associated with information sharing about bathroom behavior or personal ailments has been long debated among Deaf people.  Letting others know where you are going when you leave the room is expected of Deaf people, even if the bathroom is your destination.  Adding a vivid description of what transpired in the bathroom is not.  Yet, it is not that unusual to be at the receiving end of a detailed description of a difficult bowel movement or colorful vomit.  This openness can be considered emblematic of Deaf culture…that is it is not customary or expected of Deaf people to be graphic, yet such descriptions are not that unusual within the Deaf community.  CODA Will makes  this point in his another YouTube presentation —  What do you think?

Cultural Detective Highlights Deaf Culture

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Anna:

Cultural Detective: Deaf Culture Value Lens

Cultural Detective: Deaf Culture Value Lens

Tom and I are proud to be among the distinguished authors in the Cultural Detective series, which provides online tools to develop intercultural sensitivity and includes over 50 culture-specific packages from Argentina to New Zealand. In Cultural Detective: Deaf Culture, a “Value Lens” illustrates the values important in Deaf Culture, including Collaboration, Shared Information, Straight Talk and Group Orientation. Then through several critical incident stories we see how a clash of value can lead to misunderstandings. Strategies for bridging these gaps are taught.

A recent post on Cultural Detective’s blog highlighted issues in Deaf Culture in the wake of the controversy about ASL interpreter Lydia Callis. Read the blog post here. What do you think about the post-Hurricane Sandy comedy shows poking fun at the expressive interpretation of Ms. Callis?